eureka mountain bike park map
Our favorite local skills park

Eureka Mountain Bike Park

The Mountain Bike Shed has worked with the City of Eureka to get this park in place. Construction begins Jan 13 with and expected completion date in March 2020. It will feature beginner trails, flow lines, and a dual slalom course built by Cam Zink and Sensus Rad Trails. Located at the Timbers of Eureka, #1 Coffee Park

Gateway Off-Road Cyclist Trails Nearby

West Tyson County Park (Chubb) Trail

Chubb Trail Bike Map

Info provided by www.GorcTrails.com Be sure to join GORC to help grow and maintain local trails. Yearly membership availabilty.


"West Tyson County Park has the trailheads of both the Chubb and Flint Quarry Trails. The Chubb begins at the Circle at the top of the road to the left as you enter the park, and Flint Quarry at the parking lot at the end of the lower entrance. There is a 0.3 mile connector between the 2 trailheads. Both trails come together at the Picnic Table, around 1.5 miles into either trail. The Chubb continues on down to the Meramec River bottom while the Flint Quarry makes use of part of the Chubb, and the trail formerly known as the Ridge Trail, making its way back to its starting point for a 3 mile loop. Both trails at this end offer many opportunities to test your skills with steep climbs, loose rocks, drop-offs, and tight switchbacks. This section of the Chubb contains "the Steps", an exposed section of the Kimmswick Limestone, which is sure to challenge your technical ability. The eastern end is mainly dirt singletrack with a moderately steep climb that ends at the trailhead in Lone Elk County Park. In between, there are some technical sections, but for the most part, the trail winds along the flat river bottom. The Lone Elk connector is subject to standing water and even flooding after rain, so it’s to be avoided when wet conditions are present. The Chubb and Flint Quarry trails are more durable when wet, but can be very treacherous due to the slippery rocks.

The 1.5 mile Flint Quarry trail was built in September of 2000 with the help of over 90 volunteers!!! Thanks to GORC member Sam Mitchell (trail designer and advocate), who with the help of Sue Kuhnert from St. Louis County Parks, put on the largest and most successful workdays ever in St. Louis.

DIRECTIONS

From St. Louis, go west on 1-44. Get off at Lewis Road Exit 266. Enter West Tyson Park, make first right, follow to the end of the road and park. Or, the Lone Elk end of Chubb Trail can be reached by exiting 1-44 at Meramec Station Road (Hwy 141). Turn right (west) on the Outer Road. Follow this to Lone Elk County Park. The Chubb Trailhead is the fire road before the Lone Elk gates.

PARK HISTORY

Reprinted from the St. Louis County Parks website:

Originally, a part of the Federal Government’s Tyson Valley Powder Plant, the initial 240 acres of West Tyson was conveyed to St. Louis County in 1955. In 1979, St. Louis County purchased the additional 410 Mincke Tract with a L&WCF grant. In 1985, the Chubb Trail, which was developed by the St. Louis County Department of Parks and Recreation and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources through the cooperative efforts of MRRA, was opened. The trail is open to hikers, equestrians and mountain bikes. Access to the Chubb Trail can be obtained through either West Tyson or Lone Elk County Parks."

Greensfelder County Park

Greensfelder County Park Bike trail map

Info provided by www.GorcTrails.com Be sure to join GORC to help grow and maintain local trails. Yearly membership availabilty.


"This is a very hilly park, and all of the trails are either going up or down for the entire length, some of it in the shadow of the Six Flags roller coasters! Because of this steep terrain, large parts of these trails, mainly the low-lying areas, are slow to dry. Waiting 2-3 days after a rain is a good rule of thumb, except in very dry or frozen conditions. The upper part of Dogwood going counter clockwise is almost always rideable, but the bottom will typically remain wet for a long period after rain since the whole area drains down through it. Please use your best judgment on deciding whether to ride them when they are wet.

Many changes have taken place since GORC has reworked parts of existing trails, and built several new ones. The Dogwood loop was almost completely rerouted from 2004-06, and the DeClue trail has added considerable mileage, now stretching to 8 miles, and the current focus is in the northwest corner of the park on the Beulah Trail.

Due to the number of trail features, and its rocky surface, DeClue (8 miles) is considered a fairly technical place to ride. Expect a tough workout, and some sections that may require hike-a-bike (for short runs). If you like choosing your lines, fast narrow descents, and rocks to test your skills, then you'll love this trail. Dogwood (2.6 miles) is fast and flowy, with a banked s-turn, and some rocky spots thrown in to keep you on your toes. Eagle Valley (3.4 miles) is chat-covered doubletrack with the exception of 0.3 miles of singletrack behind the Visitor Center, and a short section near the stables. The Green Rock now shares a large part of its length with the DeClue trail. Its total length has increased to 14.5 miles, of which 8 are in Greensfelder.

All of the trails in the park are open to hikers, bikers, and equestrians. Trail traffic often includes horses, so be careful and courteous when encountering equestrian traffic. Always dismount your bike and go off the downhill side of the trail. For the most part though, this park is not heavily used. Make sure and take the bug spray in the summer.

If you want to "taste" Greensfelder before diving in, ride the Dogwood trail first. Depending on how you choose to ride the loops, you can get in rides from 8 to more than 18 miles just on Dogwood/DeClue/Eagle Valley.

DIRECTIONS

Take Interstate 44 to the Allenton/Six Flags Exit 261. Go north on Allenton Rd,  past the Six Flags entrance. Allenton Rd. bisects Greensfelder Park. Parking is in the gravel parking lot for the Roundhouse Memorial on the left just before Hencken road.

SERVICES

There is a pit toilet at the trailhead, and at the 2 picnic shelters. Water is available at the 2 shelters and the learning center."


Bluffview/Zombie Trail

Zombie Bike Trail map

Info provided by www.GorcTrails.com Be sure to join GORC to help grow and maintain local trails. Yearly membership availabilty.


"Bluff View is the newest addition to the St. Louis county network of trails. This 12 mile round-trip singletrack trail was started in 2009 and completed in 2018 by GORC and Americorps volunteers. The Bluff View trail features some rocky outcroppings, sustained climbs and descents and beautiful terrain. The trail's namesake will make you stop in your tracks to take in the expansive view of the Meramec river and Crescent Valley. If you know where to look you can pick out hints of the Chubb trail hillsides and a section of the Al Foster.

The Bluff View Trail is a lollipop that connects to the Al Foster Trail and Rock Hollow.  The western half of Bluff View in Rock Hollow (also called Zombie Trail by trail users) can be accessed from the Rock Hollow paved trail. The trail switchbacks up, through, under and around spectacular rock formations.  Bluff View (Rock Hollow/Zombie) weaves in and out of multiple hollows and eventually leads you back to the pavement. Crossing over the pavement leads to the eastern part of BV/RH, which features a 6-switchback climb that gets you up to a high point, and then brings you down through a rock chute and eventually back down to the pavement where you cross back to the eastern side to complete the loop.  Continue on the trail to return back to the trailhead for a 12-mile total round trip.

Between Sherman Park, Al Foster, and now Bluff View, you can assemble a lengthy ride in multiple configurations.

DIRECTIONS

From St. Louis - From I-44 take the Hwy 109 exit and then head north. Proceed 3.0 miles and go right on Old State Road and travel 1/2 mile up the hill before turning right into the Bluff View trailhead parking lot.

Alternate access to Glencoe trailhead:
From St. Louis - Get on I-44 towards Six Flags but exit before you get that far on Hwy 109 heading north, then proceed 3.0 miles and go right on Old State Road then right immediately on Washington Ave/Grand Ave. to the parking lot on your left."